Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2 Brings The Cult RPG Series To The Modern Age – GameSpot

Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2 Brings The Cult RPG Series To The Modern Age Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It’s fun to be a vampire.By Alessandro Fillari on March 21, 2019 at 10:31PM PDT After many teases on social media, Paradox Interactive and Hardsuit Labs have finally revealed Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2, the sequel to the original 2004 RPG. With Bloodlines 2, releasing in 2020 for PC and consoles, several key members from the former studio Troika Games, along with some new blood at Hardsuit Labs, are looking to pick up where the bleak yet off-the-wall original left off. Just before its reveal, we had the chance to get an early look, while also speaking with Bloodlines 2 lead narrative designer Brian Mitsoda and senior writer Cara Ellison about the making of the sequel.As an adaptation of the table-top game series from White Wolf Publishing, the first Bloodlines focused on the shadowy underworld of Vampire society in modern-day Los Angeles. Starting out as a newly converted vampire, you were drawn into centuries-long quarrels amongst elite vampires, all the while coming to grips with your new and unusual circumstances. While much of the first game hasn’t aged too well, its in-depth role-playing and social gameplay are enduring achievements. Showing shades of immersive-sims like Deus Ex and System Shock, it possessed an impressive amount of complexity with how you could use your vampiric abilities to navigate the complex web of conspiracies within the secret society.The game’s original developers, Troika Games, drafted up concepts for a follow-up, however, low sales and a lack of projects after Bloodlines’ launch forced the closure of the studio. In the years since its release, a dedicated online community has kept the game active, slowly turning the obscure PC
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Windows Virtual Desktop is now in public preview – TechCrunch

Last year, Microsoft announced the launch of its Windows Virtual Desktop service. At the time, this was a private preview, but starting today, any enterprise user who wants to try out what using a virtual Windows 10 desktop that’s hosted in the Azure cloud looks like will be able to give it a try. It’s worth noting that this is very much a product for businesses. You’re not going to use this to play Apex Legends on a virtual machine somewhere in the cloud. The idea here is that a service like this, which also includes access to Office 365 ProPlus, makes managing machines and the software that runs on them easier for enterprises. It also allows employers in regulated industries to provide their mobile workers with a virtual desktop that ensures that all of their precious data remains secure. One stand-out feature here is that businesses can run multiple Windows 10 sessions on a single virtual machine. It’s also worth noting that many of the features of this service are powered by technology from FSLogix, which Microsoft acquired last year. Specifically, these technologies allow Microsoft to give the non-persistent users relatively fast access to applications like their Outlook and OneDrive applications, for example. For most Microsoft 365 enterprise customers, access to this service is simply part of the subscription cost they already pay — though they will need an Azure subscription and pay for the virtual machines that run in the cloud. Right now, the service is only available in the US East 2 and US Central Azure regions. Over time, and once the preview is over, Microsoft will expand it to all of its cloud regions.
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Epic Games shows impressive next-gen physics and destruction system in Unreal Engine 4.23 – DSOGaming

At GDC 2019, Epic Games showcased some really impressive and next-gen physics and destruction systems that will be coming to the latest version of Unreal Engine 4. As Epic Games noted, Chaos is Unreal Engine’s new high-performance physics and destruction system coming in early access to Unreal Engine 4.23.The real-time tech demo is set within the world of Robo Recall and with Chaos, users can achieve cinematic-quality visuals in real time in scenes with massive-scale levels of destruction, with unprecedented artist control over content creation.To be honest, the start of this tech demo reminded me the lobby scene in The Matrix (so I guess that’s a good thing). Still, the building destruction towards the end of the video gave me a really next-gen feeling so I guess these new systems will be only used for next-gen titles. I mean, Xbox One X is unable to offer such destruction even with the power of the cloud as we saw in Crackdown 3.Anyway, this demo looks really incredible so go ahead and take a look!
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Opera for Android ships with free VPN – Engadget

If you’re unfamiliar with VPNs, the service allows you to create a private connection with a remote server that will communicate with websites that you’re visiting. Instead of sending and receiving information over a public network where it could potentially be intercepted by a malicious actor, all of those exchanges are handled by the server. With an encrypted connection between your phone and the VPN server, your data is indecipherable to anyone trying to spy on your actions online.Opera’s built-in VPN uses 256-bit encryption to protect data. It also obscure’s a user’s true location by connecting to servers located around the world. While the company didn’t specify what will be available for locations for its VPN, the beta version allowed users to select servers in America, Europe or Asia, or use a setting to automatically pick the best available connection. Opera is also promising not to keep logs of user activity, so it won’t retain any data in a way that might allow someone to identify an individual based on their online activity.
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Apple now sells five different iPads – The Verge

Recommending an iPad used to be simpler. White or black? How much storage do you want? Those were the days. Tablets were a confusing space and the iPad brought clarity. Now, Apple sells five different iPads with two different connectors and two different Apple Pencils. Which means clarity looks a little different. Of course, Apple still offers clear documentation to explain its every change, like which Apple Pencil works with which iPad model. While the move does mean that every iPad is now compatible with an Apple Pencil of one sort or another, its brand-new iPad Air and iPad Mini weirdly only work with the first-generation Apple Pencil, not the newer version that elegantly attaches to the tablet’s side. If you’ve never charged the old model, here’s what you have to look forward to: Today’s announcement of the refreshed iPad Mini and iPad Air shows Apple in rare form, bringing old ideas back to the forefront instead of courageously killing them like it did with the headphone jack, optical drive or 30-pin iPod connector. It’s nice to see that it’s willing to refresh older tablets with some modern hardware specs and features, but it highlights how messy and confusing the business of buying an iPad (and accessories for it) has become. This infamous tweet comes to mind: Meanwhile, let’s consider the iPad Air. The Air was once the most premium model that Apple offered, and now its revival is being slotted somewhere in the middle of the pack, above the new iPad Mini, but below the iPad Pro. As Dieter posits below, what does ‘Air’ even mean anymore? It’s no longer the most powerful option, nor does it have the most dazzling design. It does have a headphone jack, though. No matter which iPad you’re buying, you should know that
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Activision unveils mobile ‘Call of Duty’ with global rollout plan – Seeking Alpha

Activision (NASDAQ:ATVI) used Unity’s GDC keynote tonight to unveil Call of Duty: Mobile, an Android/iOS version of its long-time flagship franchise now set for worldwide availability. The game was originally announced as a game coming to China, but “in collaboration with Tencent (OTCPK:TCEHY),” the game is headed to “previously unannounced regions, including North America, South America, Europe, and more.” The free-to-play game was developed by Tencent’s Timi studio and offers multiple game modes (including Team Deathmatch, Search and Destroy and Free-For-All) for head-to-head action. Click to subscribe to real-time analytics on ATVINow read: Facebook: The Living Dead »Subscribe for full text news in your inbox
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AMD addresses Spoiler vulnerability: Ryzen users are safe from this one – TechSpot

In context: Researchers continue to find ways to abuse and exploit speculative execution on modern CPUs. The newest vulnerability has been named “Spoiler,” and while it’ll likely be a thorn in Intel’s side for some time to come with no viable solution, AMD’s processors are unaffected claims the CPU maker. Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in the US, and the University of Lübeck in Germany, recently discovered another speculative execution vulnerability impacting Intel processors. Dubbed “Spoiler,” and like Spectre before it, the flaw preys upon the CPU’s speculative execution engine that presciently guesses upcoming computations to boost performance. As the research paper explains, Spoiler is entirely independent from Spectre, so existing mitigations for Spectre and Meltdown have no effect on the new flaw. Spoiler is a complicated problem, but the paper offers a summary of sorts. We have discovered a novel microarchitectural leakage which reveals critical information about physical page mappings to user space processes. The leakage can be exploited by a limited set of instructions, which is visible in all Intel generations starting from the 1st generation of Intel Core processors, independent of the OS and also works from within virtual machines and sandboxed environments. The researchers also tested AMD and ARM-based processors, but found that they were not susceptible in the same way Intel’s processors are. This makes Spoiler a problem unique to Intel, and it’s already found itself reeling after the frenzy that was Spectre and Meltdown. And just like those two flaws, there’s no viable software-only mitigation; microarchitecure level changes could help, but it’d come at the cost of performance. No doubt relieved, AMD has confirmed Spoiler does not impact Ryzen processors. We are aware of the report of a new security exploit called SPOILER which can gain access to partial address information during load operations.
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